Far Infrared Sauna

“Provides Many Health Benefits”

FYI

Scientists in Japan report that with infrared sauna treatment for clogged capillary vessels that heat will expand the capillaries and then initiates the start of a process to dissolve hidden toxins.

Further studies show that infrared saunas promote detoxification, elimination of fats, toxins, heavy metals, substances from food processing, free fatty acids and excess sodium associated with hypertension and uric acid.

Another study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis showed a reduction in pain, stiffness and fatigue during infrared sauna therapy.

Reference:  National Center for Biotechnology, Pub MED

Save Your Energy With Infrared Saunas

Journal of American Medical Association states:  “A moderately conditioned person can easily sweat off 500 grams in a sauna, using nearly 300 Kcal which is equivalent to running 2-3 miles!  While the weight of the water loss can be regained by drinking water, the calories consumed will not be.””

References:  Ward Dean, “Effect of Sweating,” Journal of American Medical Association, Vol. 246, No 6, Aug.7, 2001.

 

Difference Between Infrared Sauna and Traditional Saunas

Infrared sauna uses infrared heaters to emit infrared radiant heat which is absorbed directly into the human body, unlike traditional saunas which heat the body indirectly via air or steam.

 

History of Infrared Saunas

The infrared sauna was developed and highly researched in Japan.  The Japanese currently use infrared saunas for many health conditions including cancer, respiratory and cardiovascular rehabilitation.  The infrared is widely used in many European health spas and detox centers.  The United States is slowly catching up with modern advances in the use of infrared therapy.

General Review of the benefits of Infrared

Pain Relief

Infrared energy can penetrate up to 1.5″ deep into connective and muscle tissue.  This heat relieves pain by expanding blood vessels and increasing circulation.

Weight Control

Sweating consumes calories, increases heart rate, cardiac output and metabolic rate.  It also decreases body cellulite which is a gel substance made up of water and waste.

Detoxification

The body eliminates most toxins by sweating.  Infrared heat therapy stimulates the sweat glands that cleanse and detoxify the skin.

Reduces Stress, Promotes Relaxation

Infrared heat relaxes the body and softens connective tissue.

Great for Skin

Improves circulation, removes dirt, chemicals and dead cells on the surface of the skin.

*Always check with your physician or healthcare practitioner for possible interactions between drugs, pregnancy, certain diseases and use of infrared saunas.

Mary Jo Ruggieri, PhD, RPP

Healthy Tidbits

Magnesium VIP Mineral

According to the American Heart Association Newsletter (April 30, 2005), studies indicate that not having enough magnesium in your diet may increase your chances of developing artery disease:

Fat metabolism caused by magnesium deficiency is linked to the development of arteriosclerosis.

Magnesium intake is an important factor in controlling fat metabolism in the walls of arteries.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (news release Dec 2, 2004) researchers found that magnesium helps regulate a key brain receptor that plays an important role in memory and a magnesium deficiency may result in a diminished learning and memory capacity.

 

The study also states that an abundance of magnesium intake can improve such cognitive functions. MIT continues on saying that magnesium deficiency may result in reduced ability to learn and memorize, also cognitive function may be improved by an abundance of magnesium!

Research Studies About Magnesium:

Magnesium Good For Old Bones

RealAge Smart Search ( BETA), the leading expert driven health search. Learn more magnesium good for old bones. Dec 01, 2005 12:40 PM New York ( Reuters health)

http://www.realage.com/news_features/articler.aspx?id=12191

Diet Rich In Magnesium Good For Health

RealAge Smart Search ( BETA), the leading expert driven health search. Learn more Diet Rich in Magnesium Good for Health by Edelson HealthDay reporter Monday, March 27

http://healthlibrary.epnet.com/GetContent.aspx?token=d291a9f5-2226-447d-88bf-2cb7e6905ec3&chunkiid=120121

Winter Is On Its Way

Things to do now

  • Start to build your Immune system. Best to use a herbal formula like Healthy Cell. Start with 30 drops daily for 3 weeks, take 1 week off then repete.
  • Increase your Vitamin D by 2,000 IUs. Especially effective when the days (and sun) get shorter and nights longer. The days are shorter and the sunshine is spare.
  • Add a B complex daily which will help strengthen your nervous system.
  • Start to go to bed earlier and transition to more indoor exercises such as stationary bike, exercise balls or treadmills.
  • Start skin brushing: Use a skin brush once per day.
  • Enroll in a yoga or meditation class (stress can decrease your immune system’s ability to fight off infection).
  • Get body work at least 2x per month. Polarity is Best!

Reference: Mary Jo Ruggieri PhD www.columbuspolarity.com

Reducing Sinusitis Naturally

The first thing of prime importance in handling sinusitis is the Neti pot!!

If you do not have one and do not how to use one, the time is now!

Sinusitis is often caused by air pollution and other unhealthy multiple environmental conditions.  Our primary air filters are our nose and sinuses. Weakened immune systems also can cause colds and infections which contribute to sinusitis.  Colds and infections can lead to sinusitis if left untreated, especially in the context of a weakened immune system.

Natural remedies for sinusitis:

Neti pot

  • helps keep passages open and clear and gets rid of mucus

Herbal blends

  • Breathe Free
  • Breath of Life
  • HealthyCell

Homeopathies

  • Pulsatilla: helps with discharge
  • Arnica: helps pain and swelling

Infrared saunas : very effective for detoxifying, enhancing the lymphatic system and clearing your sinus problems

Aromatherapy (www.arcancient.com)

  • Eucalyptus: decongestant
  • Rosemary-Sinusitis

Reference: Mary Jo Ruggieri PhD

Autumn Soup

Autumn means cooler temperatures and shorter days.  This time of year brings to mind sitting curled up on the couch, in your favorite pair of PJs with a nice bowl of soup. Also this is a perfect time to start utilizing various warming spices. Ginger, black pepper, cumin, cayenne and various combinations of curry. The following is a basic raw soup recipe. Use your imagination and add various spices to your preference.

Butternut  Squash Soup

1 butternut squash, peeled, seeded and sliced

1 red, orange or yellow pepper

4 stalks of celery

1 red onion

1/2 cup tahini

1 Tablespoon of curry (or use less if you prefer)

1/2 teaspoon of nutmeg

Braggs amino to taste

2 scallions, minced

Blend all ingredients well and add enough water or vegetable broth to create proper consistency. Garnish with minced scallions, or yogurt, or a good feta or goat cheese.

REMINDER: when warming this soup  – be very careful just to take the chill off. You want to just warm it to a light steam. The heat will kill the live enzymes in the food.

Your food is your medicine.

Antonia Rankin, APP

Click on this link for great information on Stress and the Holidays and Kicking the Sugar Habit!

.Stress, Your Health and 12 Holiday Stress Busters

 


Holistic Health Research

Whole Grains May Reduce Hypertension

According to a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, men with high levels of whole-grain consumption were 19% less likely to develop high blood pressure than men who ate the least amount of whole grains. (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 87, No. 1, 79-90, January 2008)  It was already known that women who eat whole grains are less likely to develop hypertension, but less information about the effects on men.

Tips for Adding Whole Grains to your Diet

Whole Grain Recipies

Heidi Beke-Harrigan, MLS, APP

hbharrigan@malone.edu or  irharp1140@yahoo.com


Reflexology comes to You Tube!!

We have posted a series of videos on You Tube!  Our Holistic Health NOW video series are on What is Holistic Health.  Our current posting (series #7), is an introduction to Elemental Reflexology.  Stay tuned, as there are more to follow!

Holistic Health NOW!


Herbal of the Month

How to Make Salves or Ointments

Salves, or ointments, are easy and fun to make!

As you must know already, there are semi-solid medicinal preparations for external use only.  Salves have many applications.  They can be used for:

  • Eczema, cuts, rashes, scratches
  • Bed sores, wounds, burns
  • Chapped lips, sunburn
  • Insect bites, itching, bug repelling

They are very effective on children, and animals as well.

The ingredients for a salve are the specific herbs you will need for your purpose, a very good grade of olive oil or grapeseed oil, and some beeswax.  You will then need some little jars or tins to empty the finished product in.

Step No.1

Making a salve involves first extracting the properties of the herbs into an oil.  You can do this on top of the stove in a double boiler.  The process takes about 60 minutes of the herbs simmering in the oil on top of continuously boiling water.  Make sure the oil itself does not ever boil.

After 60 minutes or so, remove from heat, strain, and pour into jars or tins.

Step No. 2

This also involves a double boiler.  Begin with one cup of your herbal oil.  To each cup add 1/4 cup beeswax (pure and untreated).  Heat until it thickens – usually in one or two minutes.  Store finished product in small tins.

You can add Aloe Vera Gel, Vitamin E, Beta Carotene, and a drop or two of Tincture or Oil of Benzoin as a preservative, and essential oils directly in the jars or tins, and stir a little with a toothpick.  Add 20 drops for a 1/4 oz tin, 40 for a 1/2 oz. tin, 60 for and oz. jar.

Charoula Dontopoulos,

Certified Herbalist


The information in this newsletter is for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat illness or prescribe any type of medication or treatment.  For medical needs, we recommend consulting your Medical Doctor, Dietitian or Mental Health Practitioner.